The Hyatt School
The Hyatt School was built in 1898 by members of the Buck family. Floyd Buck recalls it took his father and uncle two days to complete the construction. It was named after Edward G. Hyatt one
of Riverside county's first and finest educators. He taught in the San Jacinto Valley becoming the principle of the High School then he became the superintendent of Riverside County and in later life he became the California State Superintendent of Schools.

Hyatt never saw running water or electricity. Two outhouses back of the school provided
restrooms for both boys and girls. Children washed up in a wash pan filled with water hand pumped from the windmill close by. Pumped water also filled the bucket with drinking water students dipped with a ladle or cup. In the cold winter months the oldest boy would bring in the firewood before the rest of the students arrived and build a nice fire in the woodstove to heat
up the room. Hyatt remained open until 1947.

In its nearly 50 years...
In its nearly 50 years it stood proud as a center of learning and the community center as well.
Sunday church meetings brought the local families together and Saturday nights at the school had these same families dancing and enjoying their time together.

 

1898-2010

After tireless efforts to restore the building, extensive damage and deterioration prevented us from reaching our goal.The school house will forever remain in our memory and we will keep the history alive in our logo and on our website.

 

School House History

Miss Clare Robertson
Miss Clara Robertson of Sage had taught in a small school on the Rawson Ranch nearby and another closer to Domenigoni Valley.
The first year Miss Robertson taught at the Hyatt school it stood
near Hyatt Springs. In 1902, the year Miss Robertson married Fred Cooper; it was decided to move the school closer to the children of
Auld Valley.

Mr. George Baisley used jacks to lift the small rectangular building
up on dollies and then pulled the school building to this 2 acre
piece of land. The slopping ground made a fine school yard
providing plenty of room for the shed for horse feed. Back then the teacher would ride to school in a buggy and if you didn't walk to
school barefoot you rode a horse. The horses would wait patiently
all day munching on hay.